Spring Ready-to-Wear 2015

Public School

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Public School RTW Spring 2015

Public School RTW Spring 2015

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  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015
  • Public School RTW Spring 2015

Public School RTW Spring 2015

Chow and Osborne have established a distinct dress code: sporty, minimalist street for the men and an oversize androgynous version for the women.

Public School’s Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne have established a distinct dress code: sporty, minimalist street for the men and an oversize androgynous version of the look for the women.


Chow and Osborne certainly have the popular vote. But, in truth, the collection isn’t as directional as it is cool at the moment.


It read like a uniform on their spring runway, with variations on crisp shirts (shirtdresses for the ladies), blazers and low-slung, slouchy shorts for both sexes. In the beginning everything was in black and white, a palette that defines the line’s aesthetic. But they avoided blandness by branching out with graphic prints for the first time, with graffiti and static jacquards done with touches of electric blue for added punch.

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