Spring Ready-to-Wear 2015

Matohu

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Matohu RTW Spring 2015

Matohu RTW Spring 2015

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  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015
  • Matohu RTW Spring 2015

Matohu RTW Spring 2015

Materials in their natural forms was the concept behind the spring Matohu collection.

Materials in their natural forms — earthy, organic, unprocessed. That was the concept behind the spring Matohu collection shown by designers Hiroyuki Horihata and Makiko Sekiguchi. It translated into a cohesive collection of simple yet beautiful dresses, jackets and long skirts cut from cotton, linen, silk and wool, often in their natural, undyed hues. There were also shots of darks — forest green, eggplant and black — which Horihata said represented the natural life cycle of materials through to decomposition.

The designers made each look interesting by mixing textures and adding in sheer details and/or asymmetric touches, such as gathering one blue dress on the right side of the waist. A series of hand-dyed batiks — slim ankle pants, T-shirts and softly tailored jackets — stood out. One jacket and pants set provided a refreshing jolt of yellow.

The clothes were complemented by natural rattan accessories, such as necklaces and headpieces designed and made by Sekiguchi’s mother, Yoko Sekiguchi.

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