Spring Ready-to-Wear 2015

Gabriele Colangelo

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Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015

Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015

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  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015
  • Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015

Gabriele Colangelo RTW Spring 2015

Colangelo managed to offer unexpected surprises inside the seemingly obvious.

Gabriele Colangelo usually likes to go fishing for inspiration in the art world. But this season, the designer skipped the literal references and worked from a more personal point of view, focusing on dynamic cuts to generate a sense of fluidity.

Avoiding the complications that made some of his past collections a little too tricky, Colangelo still managed to offer unexpected surprises inside the seemingly obvious. These included a 3-D cutout on the back of an otherwise simple, pretty long shirtdress cinched at the waist with a thin white belt. Laser techniques also gave movement to a group of off-white looks, including a vest-dress worn over a shirt and paired with a blazer, as well as an A-line coatdress cut with paper-like precision.

Colangelo played with various materials: Raffia blended into silk in a dress wrapped to create blue and white dégradé effects on the skin. Or copper, inserted between two layers of silk, one of them burnt, to generate blurry, mysterious shades on a long tunic. He also worked ponyskin, which he combined with soft Japanese denim, into a coat with fresh blue hues.

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