Men's Spring Collections 2015

Ann Demeulemeester

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Ann Demeulemeester Men's RTW Spring 2015

Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015

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  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015
  • Ann Demeulemeester Mens RTW Spring 2015

Ann Demeulemeester Men's RTW Spring 2015

Creative director Sébastien Meunier stuck to the codes of the brand with a light-hearted collection that played out in a monochrome and nude palette.

In his first collection since being officially named creative director of Ann Demeulemeester, Sébastien Meunier stuck to the codes of the brand and did the founder proud with a light-hearted collection that played out in a monochrome and nude palette.

Looks were layered yet retained a sense of lightness and romance, thanks to featherweight or sheer fabrics like the pastel organza that was cut into strips and pieced together on candy-stripe jackets and coats. These carried undertones of 18th-century garments, as did the sleeveless vests that were spliced into some of the looks. Crinkled, raw-edged tunics added a layer of toughness. There were decorative effects, too, but always done with a light hand. A white parka was stitched with a delicate ecru floral pattern, while tone-on-tone embroidery glistened from the mandarin-collared black coat that closed the show.

Music has always been a powerful antiwar tool. The disco-ball reflections on the lilac and golden micro-printed single- and double-breasted ensembles yelled, “Let’s not make war, let’s dance!”

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