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Berluti Throws Garden Party

Jeremy Irons, the luxury house’s new ambassador, was among attendees.

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Jeremy Irons

Jeremy Irons

Photo By Stéphane Feugère

RAINING MEN: It was a picture-perfect setting at the Berluti show on Friday night. There was no front row. Instead, attendees mingled in the garden of Paris’ Hôtel de Sully sipping cocktails, while models posed in oversized, abstract frames, harking back to Impressionist paintings. 

English Actor Jeremy Irons, the luxury house’s new ambassador, blended in with the crowd. “I’m off to a fantastic holiday in Ireland,” he divulged, sporting a three-piece suit and no tie. “I’m going home there, sail my boat, ride my horses and — chill.”

Irons said he doubts his movie “A Magnificent Death from Shattered Hand” would ever see the light of day, but did say there would be other film projects later this year. “I’m lazy; I want my summer,” he said with a smirk. “Ireland, when the sun shines, is the Promised Land — much better than here,” said Irons, mocking the gray skies of Paris.

Benn Northover applauded Berluti’s choice of mannequins — men, rather than boys who could not pull off that “not so obvious sense of masculinity” that is intrinsic to Berluti’s style. “I’m not that showy of a guy, but I wear costumes for a living. So I like something where I can feel like myself. With Berluti I’m rediscovering my sense of elegance,” said Norhover, adding that “one of the greatest gifts you get being an actor is collaborating with other artists.” And that’s precisely his plan for next fall.

The English actor will star in Norwegian artist Knut Asdam’s first feature film, playing a war photographer loosely inspired by the late Daniel Eldon.

Tuki Brando, in his fourth year of studying medicine in France, said he was still hesitating between becoming a doctor and pursuing his burgeoning modeling and acting career.

“I’ve always thought that as long as I can do both, then why not?” said the grandson of actor Marlon Brando. “I was really struck by a conversation with my philosophy teacher in the senior year of high school. He said people were not designed to have only one profession.”