Women’s Wear Daily
04.20.2014

Men's Fall Collections 2014

Man

Man Collection

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MAN Men's RTW Fall 2014

The group presentation featured designers Alan Taylor, Bobby Abley and Craig Green.

Alan Taylor for Man Mens RTW Fall 2014

Inspired by Matisse’s cutouts period and “Stop Making Sense,” the 1984 film of Talking Heads in concert, Alan Taylor took traditional men’s wear staples — the suit, the overcoat — and played with scale and proportion. A partnership with Magee of Donegal armed Taylor with an array of exclusive tweeds, which he put to work in exaggerated shapes and details.


Standouts were the navy organza parka with giant tweed patch pockets, which was worn atop a narrow tweed suit, and the finale evening overcoat in a slightly sparkly tweed, which had an almost ridiculously oversize collar that swept down to reach beyond the waist. Less successful were the hand-printed geometric forms that came on suiting.


Bobby Abley’s upbeat, sporty, Disney-infused Phantom Manor collection was in equal measures fun and terrifying. The dental implements similar to Alexander McQueen and hip-hop mouth grills were the stuff of nightmares, and also will likely propel Abley onto the front pages.


The collection itself was coherent and confident. Roomy pink furry shorts and sweaters came in gymnasium-ready shapes, while “Brains 0” or “Bye” on the back of a top, written in Disney typography, was a witty touch. Prints included playfully sinister cartoon brains and crows on barbed wire, Abley’s signature teddy bear and slogans like “Dream On.”


A somber gray windowpane check came in slim-fitting trousers and a funnel-neck top with zips around a front pouch and up the back, adding a little grown-up sobriety, while a collaboration with Piers Atkinson produced Mickey-eared or Maleficent-horned hats, which served to lighten the horror references.


There was a Byzantine feel to the hand-painted clothes on Craig Green’s catwalk, where he realized his antidigital print aesthetic in painstaking — if sometimes repetitive — pieces that came layered in complex and heavy combinations.


A “cultlike workforce” was how Green referred to the monastic simplicity of the streetwear staples in navy and black that featured butchers’ aprons, leather harnesses, floor-sweeping overcoats and crisp buttoned-up shirts — sometimes worn all at once.

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