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Front Row at Chanel

Milla Jovovich and Diane Kruger were among actresses at the show.

Diane Kruger and Milla Jovovich

Diane Kruger and Milla Jovovich

Photo By Stéphane Feugère

CHANEL NO. 3?: It seemed everything came in threes at the Chanel couture show Tuesday at the Grand Palais. Laetitia Casta, who just cozied up to Karl Lagerfeld’s cat Choupette for a photo spread in V magazine, said she has a trio of movies coming out, including the American title “Arbritrage” opposite Richard Gere, out in September. “I play a French gallerist,” she explained.

The others are an Yvan Attal comedy, “Do Not Disturb,” and a drama opposite Benoît Poelvoorde based on the Edouard Stern case, in which a banker strikes up a sadomasochistic relationship with a mistress. Next year, Casta will tread the boards in a French production of Tennessee Williams’ “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.”

Taiwanese actress Lun Mei Kwai said she just wrapped “Girlfriend and Boyfriend,” a love triangle that’s chronicled over a 30-year period. And what was her favorite decade, in terms of the costumes? “The Eighties, so lively,” she enthused.

French actress Clotilde Hesme, who stars in a Dutch movie “Three Worlds,” which comes out in October, said she just started filming a Diane Kurys comedy in which she plays the wife of a Communist militant. She also has a juicy role on a Canal+ series: as the wife of a zombie in “Les Revenants.”

Zhou Xun, Chanel’s ambassador for Greater China, said she planned to visit the house’s perfume laboratory in the days following the show. “To see the secrets behind all the perfumes,” she explained. Xun plays the female lead in the just-released Chinese blockbuster, “Painted Skin: The Resurrection,” in which she plays a fox that can change into human form.

Clémence Poésy, who had accessorized her Chanel dress with “comfortable” Acne flats, disclosed she’ll likely be starring in a play in New York this fall, but declined to give details.

Architect Peter Marino, who is an avid gardener, surveyed the room’s plants dotted with fake versions of the flower.

“Did you ever try to get a bloody camellia to bloom?” he asked.