fashion-memopad
fashion-memopad

Memo Pad: Artist's Interpretation... Losing Faith... Rolling On...

Magazine editors often change the photo portraits.

Jezebel editor Anna Holmes said that the site had received between five and 10 submissions, and that the Faith Hill shot had been chosen based on the fact that much of her body was both visible and radically altered. "Part of me was hoping for a Vogue cover," Holmes admitted. Barring that, the contest "wasn't about [Hill], it was about how magazines retouch women to make women look at times unrecognizable. The original photo — when I saw it I broke out into a big grin, not because I was having a gotcha moment, but because I said, 'Here's a woman who looks like a real woman.'" Holmes said the site was aware of the identity of the photo leaker but declined to discuss the "myriad" ways that Jezebel they had acquired the photos.

In response to a detailed e-mail request for comment, a spokesman for Hill responded, "Huh?" — Irin Carmon

ROLLING ON:
Rolling Stone publisher Tim Castelli is leaving to join Google as New York sales director. The staff was notified on Monday by chief marketing officer Gary Armstrong. Castelli joined Rolling Stone last April. Previously, he was associate publisher of Maxim and worked at Ziff Davis Media for 13 years. Castelli's last day is Wednesday. A replacement is expected to be announced shortly. — S.D.S.

NAOMI RUNS ON DUNKIN': Naomi Campbell
continues to cash in on her old antics. But this time around, she's being paid for her bad behavior by Dunkin' Donuts. Campbell, wearing a Giambattista Valli dress, stars in the company's new multi-million-dollar ad campaign by trying to prove that "it's not easy being an everyday, regular suburbanite," by breaking her Prada stiletto as she tries to plant a tree. Poking fun at her old ways, she takes her frustration out by throwing the shoe into a nearby window and then hits the tree with a shovel. The 30-second commercial, created by Hill Holiday, was directed by actor Zach Braff. Frances Allen, brand marketing officer, said Dunkin' Donuts created the campaign, in part, to celebrate regular people. Like Campbell.
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