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More Shoe Secrets from Cameron Diaz

From "Bad Teacher" to the Big Apple, the actress shares it all.

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As Footwear News revealed earlier this week, Cameron Diaz is committed to her new role as artistic director of PLV Studio, a role she has been preparing for — albeit unknowingly — for years, through her many movie projects.

Below are more excerpts from FN's exclusive conversation with the actress:

On character study:
“I live in heels. For a lot of my films, I work 12-hour days and I’m standing in heels the whole day. I always wear my character shoes when I’m on set. Even if I’m off-camera with an actor, I’m always in my shoes. I never put on a different pair of shoes. I don’t want the actor to be looking at me and be like, she’s wearing Uggs. It’s also important to maintain the same eye line for when we shoot.”
 
On “Bad Teacher:”
“The shoes in that [movie] were all my own shoes. I worked in these amazing Christian Louboutin heels. They had the perfect amount of height and I called those my sneakers. They were so comfortable I would wear them everywhere like my sneakers.”
 
On not liking platforms:
“When I first [started working on the Pour La Victoire shoe collection], the fashion at the moment was really high, high platforms. It wasn’t something I was wearing necessarily because I have so much height already. I’m such a stickler for shoes and function. And that’s what we are getting back to with this line — function.”
 
L.A. vs. N.Y.:
“When I’m in New York, I pretty much wear flats. If I get a great pair of heels that I can walk in the city in, I find myself in those heels all the time. Otherwise, if I’m in the city I wear more of a utilitarian boot. But in Los Angeles, because you’re in your car all the time, I find myself wearing heels a lot. And I really love a good heeled boot because I move quickly on my feet and I want something that’s going to stay on. That’s why with my Pour La Victoire line you see strappy bits on some shoes. Because functionally you want something that looks good on the foot but stays on the foot and doesn’t require a lot of work to do so.”

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