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Rebecca Minkoff to Open First U.S. Store

The contemporary lifestyle brand signed a lease for the SoHo space of retailer Kirna Zabête, which is moving.

NEW YORK — Rebecca Minkoff will have some big shoes to fill later this year when the brand opens its first U.S. flagship store — in the SoHo space of retailer Kirna Zabête, which is moving.

The contemporary lifestyle brand signed a lease for 96 Greene St., between Prince and Spring Streets — with a 2,000-square-foot main level and 1,800-square-foot bottom floor — and plans to open its namesake store in late summer or early fall of next year.

Rebecca Minkoff’s chief executive officer, Uri Minkoff, called opening the brand’s first freestanding boutique “a major turning point for our brand in 2013, and for the years beyond.”

Last March, a 3,000-square-foot flagship was opened in Tokyo’s central Ginza shopping center, a partnership with Tokyo Style that also includes wholesale distribution in the country for Rebecca Minkoff apparel, handbags, footwear, accessories and men’s line Ben Minkoff.

“This store will serve as an example for a parade of stores that we will open in the U.S. and abroad across 2014 and 2015. It will also pave the way for our concept for shops-in-shop in department stores that we will engage in with them,” Minkoff told WWD.

Beth Buccini, cofounder of Kirna Zabête, confirmed Friday that she and partner Sarah Easley have opted not to re-sign their lease in April. In light of substantial company growth, fueled in part by the store’s recent collaboration with Target, Buccini said the retailer has “completely outgrown its space.”

She declined to reveal the whereabouts of the “significantly bigger” location that will open in late spring, although Buccini confirmed the 14-year-old store will remain in the neighborhood.

“We used to have seven dressing rooms, and now we’re down to two. It’s also just time for a redesign, so when our lease came up, we said we need more, bigger, better and shinier — and not the space we designed when we were 26 years old,” Buccini said.