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Ke$ha and More... Chelsea Clinton's "Majestic" Day...

Ke$ha headlines Casio's third annual “Shock the World” event.

Keha
Bryan Greenberg

Bryan Greenberg

Photo By Courtesy Photo

KE$HA AND MORE: Casio unveiled several new watch models at the Hammerstein Ballroom in Manhattan on Monday night, but Ke$ha was the headliner at the third annual “Shock the World” event. The singer went through a slew of wardrobe changes and, while praising her Baby-G watch as “indestructible,” lamented the state of her love life. “Men are idiots…especially if you’re a strong woman and you say what you want and you say what you mean….It takes a very confident and ballsy man to try to date me.” Basketball star Lamar Odom of the champion Los Angeles Lakers, who is married to Khloe Kardashian and is a brand ambassador for the Ultimate Tough G-Shock watch, had some sage advice on the matter. “Communication…and sleep.”

Bryan Greenberg, an ambassador for Casio’s Edifice Black Label, was also on hand, along with Richie Rich, Gabourey Sidibe, Danielle Staub and Maksim Chmerkovskiy, among others.

PARTY PEOPLE: Apparently it was nearly dawn when Chelsea Clinton and Marc Mezvinsky called it quits at the after party that followed their Astor Courts wedding. But the happy couple weren’t the only ones to hang on until 4:30 or 5 a.m. Former President Clinton was another night crawler, so much so that, as the hours wore on, he retreated to the nearby house where they were staying to lose the tux for the second round, according to a source who asked not to be named. Once the reception started to wind down, guests hit the property’s indoor tennis court, which was covered with Guastavino-type tiles. Lighting designer Bentley Meeker set the stage for the three-day celebration. In a phone interview Tuesday, he said his favorite point of enlightenment was at the July 30 rehearsal dinner in Grassmere, N.Y. Held in an old stone barn owned by Pamela Newhouse, the location had one exposed wall. “At one point, the light inside perfectly matched the light outside. It was one of the most majestic moments I have ever seen,” he said.

Meeker, whose portfolio includes Catherine Zeta-Jones and Michael Douglas’ wedding, also has lit up Cynthia Rowley’s fashion shows and has helped execute Ralph Lauren’s shows.

KALEIDOSCOPE EYES: Now that it’s arrived in Manhattan, Target isn’t scaling back the spectacles. On Aug. 18, the discounter will hold an event at the Standard New York, Target Kaleidoscopic Fashion Spectacular, that will be part light show, part runway show and part dance theater. The hotel’s southern facade will be illuminated as 66 dancers in 155 rooms perform a piece of choreography synchronized with fast-paced lighting patterns and set to a music score. The dancers will be dressed in fall styles from Mossimo, Merona, Converse One Star, Xhilaration, Pure Energy and Liz Lange. At the same time they’re dancing, a simultaneous presentation will take place in the street, with models appearing in a nine-room stage that replicates the hotel’s notorious windows. The entire event will be broadcast via live-stream on Target’s Facebook page. Select fall styles will be available for preorder.

Jeff Halmos and Sam Shipley

Jeff Halmos and Sam Shipley

Photo By Steve Eichner

SHIPPING OUT: Shipley & Halmos designers Sam Shipley and Jeff Halmos are hitting the road on an 11-city “Fill in the Blank” tour of Barneys Co-op stores. The road trip kicks off Aug. 12 in New York and ends up in Seattle Aug. 26. The idea is to connect with customers without succumbing to the same-old trunk show shtick, which Halmos describes as “awkward.” Instead of the standard meet, greet and shop event, Shipley and Halmos will photograph customers and ask them to complete a “Mad Libs”-style questionnaire, all of which will be compiled into a book to be sold at Barneys this fall. “We came up with this idea of how we could get our customers to be involved in the creation of a product where they would interact with us,” said Halmos. “And it’s not like, go try on our clothes and get your picture taken. We want to capture the customer who shops at Barneys.”