fashion-scoops
fashion-scoops

Jeweler Gripoix Teams Up with Elisa Nalin

The line is inspired by the Italian stylist’s travels.

fashion-scoops/news

NEW HORIZONS: Paris-based jewelry house Gripoix, which specializes in pâte de verre, or poured glass, has teamed up with stylist Elisa Nalin on a capsule collection of colorful jewels inspired by her travels.

Consisting of around 30 pieces, the line was unveiled on Sunday at hairdresser David Mallett’s private salon in Paris. Items included a multicolor bead necklace that could be split into several bracelets; an earring shaped like a safety pin; teardrop-shaped rings, and woven leather bracelets studded with colored stones.

“It’s very playful, because that’s the way I wear jewelry,” said Nalin, pointing to statement necklaces inspired by souvenirs she picked up on her trips to Mexico or Turkey. Another necklace featured four rows of chains, alongside a medallion and clasp studded with lapis blue, turquoise and yellow stones.

“That’s inspired by the first piece I had from Gripoix. It was a vintage necklace that actually my ex-husband gave to me, and it was the only present I’ve ever liked in the seven years of the relationship,” she said with a laugh.

A fixture on street style blogs thanks to her colorful outfits, the Italian-born stylist and consultant worked briefly as a designer after completing her studies at the European Institute of Design in Milan. She said the jewelry line was the first thing she had designed under her own name.

Gripoix, which in its 140-year history has supplied houses including Chanel, Balmain, Dior, Givenchy and Lanvin, continues to produce jewels for brands such as Schiaparelli and Yde alongside its own collections.

Marie Keslassy, owner and artistic director of Gripoix, said the Elisa Nalin line was part of an effort to make the brand more accessible and widen its distribution. Wholesale prices will run from 50 euros, or around $70 at current exchange, for a ring to 750 euros, or $1,035, for a necklace.

“We would really like to get into department stores,” Keslassy explained. “Previously, Gripoix had a pricing problem, because everything is handmade in France. Even though it was beautiful, people always said it was too expensive. So today, we are really combining business with pleasure.”

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