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Harvey Nichols Launches Rahul Mishra's Collection

The collection, inspired by the lotus flower, is crafted in merino wool.

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MISHRA'S MERINO: Harvey Nichols has teamed up with Woolmark to launch the International Woolmark Prize's 2014 winner Rahul Mishra's collection, which made its debut in the Knightsbridge store Tuesday. The six-piece capsule collection is all done in merino wool and spotlights structured silhouettes including a cape-style jacket, a fitted tube dress and a shift dress with a peplum at the waist. Mishra, who hails from Delhi, India, said that the designs took inspiration from the lotus flower, and that all the pieces had been hand-made in India. “The fabrics are hand woven [and] the embroidery is done by hand, so a single garment would take almost eight to ten days [to complete],” said Mishra. The collection is priced from 540 pounds, or $892 for a black wool dress through to 807 pounds, or $1,333 for the peplum dress. Alongside being sold at Harvey Nichols in London, the collection will also be sold via the store’s Web site, harveynichols.com. In addition, the collection will launch globally at stores including Saks Fifth Avenue, 10 Corso Como, Joyce and David Jones. Mishra was named the winner of the prize at a ceremony in Milan in February, and chosen by a jury that included Alexa Chung, Angelica Cheung, Colette Garnsey, Franca Sozzani, Frida Giannini and Tim Blanks.

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