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First Lady Wears Reed Krakoff, Michael Kors

Michelle Obama wore blue for the President's official swearing and a black sequin boatneck dress for an inaugural reception.

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"Honored and thrilled" to have dressed the First Lady for Sunday's official swearing-in ceremony, Krakoff said he heard the news from a friend's text though he had been "kind of checking intermittently all day." In a phone interview Sunday night, the designer said he and his wife Delphine then spent a few hours quietly, trying to let it settle in.

"What's so amazing is it's such a singular moment. It really is a highlight of my career," Krakoff said. "What we are most proud of is that she would choose to wear something we created for her in New York, and to have that kind of back and forth."

"What was amazing about the process was that you learn so much about yourself as a designer and your team. More than anything what this gives us is a sense of purpose that what we're doing is on the right track," he said. "It will long outlive the moment but at the same time we are incredibly honored."

Krakoff, whose signature collection was started less than three years ago, is also president and executive creative director of Coach. He said he started working on the concept for the First Lady's ultramarine abstract wash print silk shift more than three months ago. Krakoff has never met the First Lady but she wore one of his gowns to the Pritzker Awards ceremony last year.

He declined to elaborate about "the process" that went into the ultramarine shift dress out of respect to the White House. Krakoff did say the design idea stemmed from Michelle Obama's sense of style more than the ceremony's Blue Room location  - "the color of the room was a happy coincidence." "The First Lady is a strong confident modern woman. She knows what she likes and what works for her and that's what makes a style icon," he said. "She very much embraces fashion but in a way that works for her."

Mentioning several times that the dress was made in New York in his West 34th Street studio, Krakoff said none of the seamstresses knew the garment and the coordinating cashmere sweater were being made for the First Lady. "No one knew," he said.

Now that millions do, Krakoff plans to celebrate with his six-person design team and staff on Tuesday when they return to work after the Martin Luther Day holiday. Still unsure as to how they will mark the occasion said, "It's more about something personal than valuable. Maybe a print of an image from the news or something to do with the sketches."

"Honored and thrilled" to have dressed the First Lady for Sunday's official swearing-in ceremony, Krakoff said he heard the news from a friend's text though he had been "kind of checking intermittently all day." In a phone interview Sunday night, the designer said he and his wife Delphine then spent a few hours quietly, trying to let it settle in.

"What's so amazing is it's such a singular moment. It really is a highlight of my career," Krakoff said. "What we are most proud of is that she would choose to wear something we created for her in New York, and to have that kind of back and forth."

"What was amazing about the process was that you learn so much about yourself as a designer and your team. More than anything what this gives us is a sense of purpose that what we're doing is on the right track," he said. "It will long outlive the moment but at the same time we are incredibly honored."

Krakoff, whose signature collection was started less than three years ago, is also president and executive creative director of Coach. He said he started working on the concept for the First Lady's ultramarine abstract wash print silk shift more than three months ago. Krakoff has never met the First Lady but she wore one of his gowns to the Pritzker Awards ceremony last year.

He declined to elaborate about "the process" that went into the ultramarine shift dress out of respect to the White House. Krakoff did say the design idea stemmed from Michelle Obama's sense of style more than the ceremony's Blue Room location  - "the color of the room was a happy coincidence." "The First Lady is a strong confident modern woman. She knows what she likes and what works for her and that's what makes a style icon," he said. "She very much embraces fashion but in a way that works for her."

Mentioning several times that the dress was made in New York in his West 34th Street studio, Krakoff said none of the seamstresses knew the garment and the coordinating cashmere sweater were being made for the First Lady. "No one knew," he said.

Now that millions do, Krakoff plans to celebrate with his six-person design team and staff on Tuesday when they return to work after the Martin Luther Day holiday. Still unsure as to how they will mark the occasion said, "It's more about something personal than valuable. Maybe a print of an image from the news or something to do with the sketches."

Michelle Obama stepped out Sunday night in her second American designer of the day - Michael Kors. The First Lady chose a black sequin boatneck dress for an inaugural reception at The National Building Museum. The self-described Mom-in-Chief wore kitten heels walking across the stage hand-in-hand with the president.

Kors also designed the sleeveless dress the First Lady wore for her official White House portrait.

The First Lady struck another blue note Monday morning wearing a sculpted textured blue coat to the National Prayer Service at the Washington National Cathedral.

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