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United Colors of Benetton Renovates Miami Store

The store was "designed to incorporate the South Beach look," said Ari Hoffman, president and chief executive officer of Benetton’s U.S. operations.

BENETTON GOES NATIVE: United Colors of Benetton has gone local. The newly renovated store in Miami’s South Beach is decorated in tropical hues, turquoise, pink, mauve, grass green and gray. A neon sign outside the store reads Benetton South Beach and signage inside refers to the store by its new name. “This is the most site-specific store,” said a Benetton spokesman.

Designers from Fabrica, Benetton Group’s design and research center, created hand-painted murals of a palm leaf print to decorate interior walls and columns, as well as an Art-Deco-inspired feature table to showcase merchandise. The custom furniture system is made from modular shapes that fit together in different combinations, bringing to mind the beach and its pastel-colored landmark buildings. Horizontal slats like those found in cabanas are painted in a rainbow of colors. In the center of the store, illuminated fluorescent tubes radiating outward form a modern chandelier. Flooring goes from weathered boardwalk-style reclaimed wood to slick Italian terrazzo.

“Miami is an important market for Benetton not only domestically but for its international gateway role with tourists from Europe and Latin America,” said Ari Hoffman, president and chief executive officer of Benetton’s U.S. operations. “This store is different from any other store, as it is designed to incorporate the South Beach look. Starting with the pop-up store in New York’s SoHo, which closes on Dec. 31, the South Beach store is the next relevant move forward in connecting with the brand’s roots in art, architecture and design.”

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