fashion-features
fashion-features

Miuccia Prada On China, the Web — and More

In an exclusive interview with WWD, the designer discussed everything from the challenges of globalization to fast fashion.

fashion-features/news
View Slideshow

Prada RTW Spring 2011

Photo By Jonah Kessel

Prada RTW Spring 2011

Photo By Jonah Kessel

Prada RTW Spring 2011

Photo By Jonah Kessel

WWD: One day could you make separate collections for different markets?
M.P.:
I don’t know. Germany is sportier, America is more minimal. They’re small differences. I don’t know how to say it in a more simple way, but the rich are the same all over the world. The intellectuals are the same all over the world.…It has always been this way. What pleases, pleases everywhere. Perhaps Japan is the only country that retains a bit of differentiation right now.

WWD: What do you think is different there?
M.P.:
It’s a little different from the others. There is something about that country that escapes me.

WWD: We are really curious about your decision to open new design studios in Paris and Hong Kong. Why did you decide to do this, and how will it work?
M.P.:
We decided to do this because not everyone wants to live in Milan.…I made a curious twist on the French word flâner, which means that when the people wanted to understand what was happening, they strolled the city. Now people travel the world. People really spend one day here, one day there, and then they want to spend two years here and two years there. I’d say it was almost a practical necessity…also it’s clearly an opportunity to get some young minds, fresher minds.

WWD: And the work in these offices will influence the design office back in Milan?
M.P.:
Definitely. [The new system] is not yet functional, but I imagine that they will think of ideas and they will make sketches and send them to Milan. Maybe they won’t come to anything, or perhaps they will be useful. Regardless, the concept is a good thing. The world is big now. If you continue to think in the same way, you’ll restrict yourself to a small world. So this is also an effort at becoming more open. We open stores everywhere, we have offices everywhere, so it’s right to do this as well.

WWD: But does this mean the creative possibilities within Milan and Italy are limited?
M.P.:
Let’s say that no one city is enough. In the end, I’m the one that does the things. But the idea of being more directly connected to other countries is important. And definitely there is a lot of turnover of young people in design studios. So, for example, the opening of an office in Paris is very useful in this sense.

WWD: So you’re trying to attract new talent?
M.P.:
More than to attract people, it’s for preventing the continual poaching of talent [laughs].

WWD: Is there a possibility that you could open other studios in other cities in the future?
M.P.:
Not for the moment. For now, let’s see how things start and how things work with these first two.

WWD: Will you travel personally to these two cities?
M.P.:
I don’t know. Probably while I’m in Paris, I’ll definitely go there…[but] they will be the ones who will be coming to Italy.

View Slideshow
Page:  « Previous Next »
VIEW ARTICLE IN ONE PAGE
load comments

ADD A COMMENT

Sign in using your Facebook or Twitter account, or simply type your comment below as a guest by entering your email and name. Your email address will not be shared. Please note that WWD reserves the right to remove profane, distasteful or otherwise inappropriate language.
News from WWD
Newsletters

Sign upSign up for WWD and FN newsletters to receive daily headlines, breaking news alerts and weekly industry wrap-ups.

LatestPublications
getIsArchiveOnly= hasAccess=false hasArchiveAccess=false