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Globes Cast Shadow Over Oscars

With the cancellation of the Golden Globes, Hollywood and the fashion industry are worried that the biggest awards show of them all, the Oscars, might be a casualty if the Writers Guild of America strike isn't settled.

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LOS ANGELES — With the cancellation of the Golden Globes, Hollywood and the fashion industry are worried that the biggest awards show of them all, the Oscars, might be a casualty if the Writers Guild of America strike isn't settled.

The decision of NBC and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association to pull the plug on the Globes gala, the kickoff to the awards and red-carpet season, has put the issue of the Oscars, which are to be broadcast Feb. 24 on ABC, squarely on the table.

Millions of dollars in marketing and advertising — for fashion and accessories houses, as well as studios, television, advertisers, stylists and, of course, movie stars and filmmakers — are at stake.

"It is a great shame the event was canceled at the last minute, as we have been working on some great dresses with some of our clients,'' designer Alice Temperley said of the Globes. "However, we hope the dispute gets resolved in time for the other events — and, of course, for the Oscars. It would be a real upset to miss the whole excitement of awards season. We also have secured a brilliant location for our Oscar party this year and hope to be able to go through with our plans."

Vanessa Seward, the designer at Azzaro, which last year dressed Kate Winslet for the Globes, said the cancellation was "very disappointing. For us, these types of events are very important because as a house we are specialized in red-carpet dresses. People in the United States really know us because of [these events]."

Scuttling the Academy Awards would cost the Los Angeles economy alone an estimated $130 million, said Jack Keyser, chief economist at the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. The cancellation of the Globes, which are being scaled down to a news conference to be broadcast by NBC on Sunday when winners will be announced, means a loss of $80 million, he said.

Even as concern mounted, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences spokeswoman Leslie Unger said Tuesday that planning for the Oscars was proceeding. "We are...not doing anything differently than we normally would," she said.
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