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October 29, 2009 11:29 AM

Eye, Fashion

A Fashion Backdrop to Dye For

Behind the scenes at the shoot.COURTESY PHOTO Stylists at WWD are no strangers to creative photo shoot locations. Abandoned subway cars, bowling alleys, surf lodges -- you name it, they've probably shot there. But what to do when an...

Behind the scenes at the shoot
Behind the scenes at the shoot.
COURTESY PHOTO

Stylists at WWD are no strangers to creative photo shoot locations. Abandoned subway cars, bowling alleys, surf lodges -- you name it, they've probably shot there. But what to do when an editor's inspiration is a painting of a lush garden, but autumn is in full blaze? Do it yourself!

Enter the WWD art department.


Most of the collaborations between stylist and art department normally takes place after a shoot has been completed. It involves using a discerning eye to select and lay out photos that best convey the theme of the story. This time, however, associate art director Amy LoMacchio and art assistant Tyler Resty got involved before the film was even snapped, building a one-of-a-kind set for stylist Bobbi Queen. Click here to see the final result >>

Resty, who studied graphic design with an emphasis on fine arts at New York Institute of Technology, hand-painted the backdrop used in the shoot, which was inspired by Jean-Honoré Fragonard's "The Swing." The whimsical painting inspired Queen to center her story on tie-dyed and ombré pieces, a theme as colorful as one could get. But this was not your average Grateful Dead fan's tie-dye. Instead, Queen chose fluid pieces with the feel of floral watercolors.

While painting, Resty amped up the color, making it more playful but still restrained enough not to overpower the clothes. Meanwhile, LoMacchio constructed paper flowers. The creative contributions of the WWD staff didn't stop there. Photographer Thomas Iannaccone even jumped in, constructing a swing as the final element of the set.

Although there were concerns about the sturdiness of the makeshift swing (a Boy Scout's knot-tying skills were sought, but to no avail), the set came together seamlessly. Queen, who usually prefers shooting on-location to in the studio, was more than happy with the result. "Amy and Tyler can turn any shoot from good to magical," she said. "I'm addicted now!"
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