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WWDPostcard: Marylou Whitney and John Hendrickson in Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

A WWD Postcard:

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John and I arrived at Cady Hill, my home here in Saratoga Springs, about a week ago after a trip to our fishing camp in the Adirondacks. We were up there in the wilds, wearing jeans, walking in the woods and fishing. We have several lakes and different fish in every lake or stream. It gets all the cobwebs out of your hair.

I put gloves on for the first time today to go to the races, because I was looking at some magazines and gloves are back! I walked in and everyone said, ‘Hurray! you were the last person to ever give them up.’

After the races, we went to the National Museum of Racing for a buffet supper before heading out to the mall — the only movie theater here — to see a special benefit screening of “Seabiscuit,” which was jam-packed with racing society. Movies are never as good as books, except for “Gone With the Wind,” which my late husband produced, but “Seabiscuit” was magnificent. They filmed some of it at the Saratoga track, and it was fun to see the parts of the racetrack you know and say, “Oh! That’s where our box is.”

Today, we went to the Meeting Room, a private club next to the racetrack, and had lunch with W.T. Young and Arthur Hancock, who both had horses racing. And tonight, we’re all going to the Wishing Well, a wonderful restaurant outside of town, where all the racing people go for dinner. We all stand and sing around the piano.

Then — our big race. Birdtown, our filly, is running in a $250,000 stakes race. That night, it’s the Silks, Satins and Stars gala, a benefit for the Special Olympics, with all the kids and lots of soap stars to make it a little more exciting. After dinner, we’ll have people over. We’ll all sit around in a teepee party tent some Comanche Indians made for me about 10 years ago and have Indian music around the campfire and have some snacks and drinks. It’s not how big the tepee is — it’s how many people you can get in it! We’ve had 40 before — a bunch of jockeys and people from the backstretch — but 12 is plenty.
Then on Sunday, we’ll have service at a chapel here, an old 1810 Dutch house that I copied, and we’ve invited about 25 or 30 people over for lunch. Every single week out here is another big week. The tradition just goes on and on!