people
people

Trudie's Style

I was finished with winter about three weeks ago," says Trudie Styler emphatically. "I'm only going to wear cotton now. No more layers of woolens."Spring may be coming along slowly outside, but in Styler's Central Park West apartment, the...

By
people/news
I was finished with winter about three weeks ago," says Trudie Styler emphatically. "I'm only going to wear cotton now. No more layers of woolens."

Spring may be coming along slowly outside, but in Styler's Central Park West apartment, the season's in full bloom. Dressed in a diaphanous white gauze dress and ecru jacket, she settles into an overstuffed sofa in her living room. Faint melodies tinkle down from the piano upstairs where her husband, Sting, is working on compositions.

It's an apt setting for her to talk about the fifth annual Rainforest Foundation benefit concert, slated for Saturday at Carnegie Hall. She's a founder of the foundation.

"The benefit has really evolved," says Styler. "It started out as sort of a low-key concert. As Bruce Springsteen says of the first one, 'I was invited to sing in someone's backyard."'

That backyard belonged to Ted and Susie Field, and Springsteen -- along with Sting, Branford Marsalis, Paul Simon and a handful of others -- raised nearly $1 million. The benefits since then have always been big draws, with names like Elton John, Tina Turner and James Taylor -- and this year, Luciano Pavarotti, Aaron Neville and Tammy Wynette.

"We really sort of got roped into doing it," Styler says with a laugh before explaining how Chief Raoni of the Kayapo tribe in Brazil asked her and Sting for help while they were visiting the rainforest in 1987.

Since its inception, the foundation has set up educational and health programs for the Brazilian Indians and has helped preserve some 16,000 square miles of Indian territory.

"Now we need to decide where to go from here," she says.

At the same time, Styler isn't neglecting her professional goals. When she and Sting got together, the media began portraying her -- a veteran actress with the Royal Shakespeare Company -- as "the jet-set leggy blonde."

"It's the kind of image that doesn't sit well with directors for serious parts," she says. "Offers began to dry up -- no thanks to the press -- and 1989 was not a great year. That's when I began thinking about producing some films."
Page: 
  • 1
  • 2
Next »
VIEW ARTICLE IN ONE PAGE
load comments

ADD A COMMENT

Sign in using your Facebook or Twitter account, or simply type your comment below as a guest by entering your email and name. Your email address will not be shared. Please note that WWD reserves the right to remove profane, distasteful or otherwise inappropriate language.
News from WWD
Newsletters

Sign upSign up for WWD and FN newsletters to receive daily headlines, breaking news alerts and weekly industry wrap-ups.

LatestPublications
getIsArchiveOnly= hasAccess=false hasArchiveAccess=false