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LONDON — “It didn’t exactly move, but it did quiver a little when I passed it,” said artist Fiona Banner after gazing at Damien Hirst’s anonymous man at the opening of “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” at the...

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LONDON — “It didn’t exactly move, but it did quiver a little when I passed it,” said artist Fiona Banner after gazing at Damien Hirst’s anonymous man at the opening of “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” at the Tate Britain last week.

Hirst’s work, “Adam and Eve Exposed,” features male and female bodies covered in sheets and gently breathing, with their private parts exposed by fig leaf cutouts. The show, which runs until May 31, is named after the 1968 Iron Butterfly album and explores sex, death, love — and rot. “The theme is right on,” said Maia Norman, a clothing designer and Hirst’s wife. “One day you think you’re immortal, and the next, it’s like, ‘Hmm, better rethink that one.’”
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