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Smoke and Mirrors

When it comes to parties, there are at least two things European designers are good for: celebrities and cigarettes.

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Anne Hathaway in Dolce and Gabbana

Photo By Steve Eichner

When it comes to parties, there are at least two things European designers are good for: celebrities and cigarettes. Both were in hefty supply Tuesday night when Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana invited 200 of their most fabulous friends to the rooftop of the Gramercy Park Hotel for a dinner celebrating the reopening of their Madison Avenue boutique.

Of course, calling it a dinner is something of an exaggeration. Some guests weren’t served their meal until nearly 11:30, and a few didn’t bother waiting around for it. Really, the night was more about star-gazing: most of the crowd simply hovered around the star-packed center table, where Eva Mendes chain smoked off the silver and glass candelabras while Rosario Dawson and Anne Hathaway engaged in some serious girl-talk.

All the smoke and matches made some nervous. “Am I on fire?” shouted club owner Simon Hammerstein, who jumped out of his seat when he smelled something burning. Lucky for him, he wasn’t—and nothing seemed to be ablaze.

Emily Mortimer arrived late, and hungry, having caught “Rock and Roll” on Broadway earlier in the night. So she and her husband Allesandro Nivola tucked into dessert and a long conversation with Billy Crudup.

By one o’clock, Natasha Richardson, Hathaway and Dawson had called it a night, but Hudson showed no signs of waning, sipping Patron with old friend Matthew McConaughey.

Meanwhile, Tara Subkoff was looking for a cigarette and eyed her pal Hudson’s nearly empty pack of American Spirits. But she thought better of it. “I’m not going to take Kate Hudson’s last cigarette.”
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