WWD.com/eye/people/family-affair-1035330
people
people

Family Affair

The Bulgari family hosted a dinner to celebrate the opening of their redone Manhattan store.

people/news
Chanel Iman at the Gramercy Park Hotel
The statues, sarcophogi, urns and amphorae that crowd the new Greek and Roman Galleries at the Metropolitan Museum of Art might be ancient, but the revellery that took place there Wednesday night was nearly Dionysian. The Bulgari family hosted a dinner to celebrate the opening of their redone Manhattan store, drawing Margherita Missoni, Emily Mortimer, Victoria Traina, Serena Boardman and Fabiola Beracasa. Meanwhile, her mother, Veronica Hearst, Lee Radziwell and Gina Lollobrigida gave the younger set a run for their money.

"Don't crush me on your way in everyone," joked the museum's director, Philippe de Montebello, as he welcomed the guests for a tour of the galleries before dinner.

Nearby, a well-heeled and almost exclusively Spanish-speaking crowd convened at Carolina Herrera’s Madison Avenue boutique to preview and purchase designer masks created for the upcoming El Museo del Barrio gala. “I love everything Latin. The food, the dance, everything,” Herrera said, leaning back and flourishing her arm as if she were to punctuate the thought with a grand “Olé!”

The designer’s enthusiasm for the cause was contagious. “I just had to buy Ralph Rucci’s mask,” Joanne de Guardiola gushed. “I could have bought five.”

Further down on Park Avenue, Arie and Coco Kopelman were honoring their daughter Jill Kargman and her new book “Momzillas.” The scene was practically a chapter come to life, with Manhattan mummies Jennifer Creel, Celerie Kemble, Helen Schifter and Muffie Potter Aston in attendance.

And down at the Gramercy Park Hotel, a fashion heavy crowd showed up to Allure's party for photographer Patrick Demarchelier. Among those in attendance were Diane von Furstenberg, Andre Leon Talley, Michael Kors, Linda Wells, Amy Astley, and Rachel Zoe, all of whom said they love the designer, even if they cannot understand half of what comes out of his mouth. "He speaks his own language," said Kors. Lowell called it "Franglish." "I understand every third word," said Wells. "The rule of the conversation is: Keep it simple," advised Astley.