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Eye Scoop

Adele Chatfield-Taylor and her husband, playwright John Guare, were invited to spend the night in the White House -- with just one proviso."We were told not to jump on the bed," said Chatfield-Taylor, in Washington for the centennial of The...

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Adele Chatfield-Taylor and her husband, playwright John Guare, were invited to spend the night in the White House -- with just one proviso.

"We were told not to jump on the bed," said Chatfield-Taylor, in Washington for the centennial of The American Academy in Rome. Those orders were from spunky social secretary Ann Stock who called last week to offer up the Lincoln Bedroom for the night. Bill and Hillary Clinton had told them they would wait up, but when Chatfield-Taylor and Guare got home from dinner at the National Gallery after midnight, the First Couple had already gone to bed. It wasn't until the next morning that Guare and Chatfield-Taylor finally caught up with Hillary, after having breakfast a deux in the Solarium. "You get a little card on your pillow where you fill out what you want for breakfast and where you want to take it," Chatsfield-Taylor revealed.

Donna Karan and her husband, Stephan Weiss, flew across the pond last week to support pal Barbra Streisand during her first performance in London in 28 years. Karan's support extended to the diva's wardrobe -- Streisand wore two flowing Karan gowns that didn't play too well with the British press. One critic said Streisand was "dressed like a refugee from Oxfam."

The barbs didn't stop there. The press knocked her for using a teleprompter for even the most inane comments and one critic thought it ironic to see Streisand sing "The Way We Were" as the audience watched the words "memories, like the corners of my mind" roll by on the screen. Another critic said the set, with fake columns, stuffed chairs and busts of Shakespeare and Lincoln, looked like "a cheap hotel room."

Tickets sold for up to $390, but the theater -- which seats 11,500 -- was not full, and ticket scalpers outside complained they couldn't even dump tickets for $90 on the first night.

While critics were lukewarm about Streisand's monologs, props and clothes, they universally applauded her voice. The Daily Express summed it up with the headline "Streisand Supreme" and said she was "the biggest star of all."
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