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Barneys Toasts Roy Lichtenstein Collection

Richard and Lisa Perry hosted a dinner to celebrate the home goods collaboration.

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Barneys Lisa Perry Roy Lichtenstein Dinner One Sutton Place South New York 2013

Lisa Perry

Photo By Lexie Moreland

Barneys Lisa Perry Roy Lichtenstein Dinner One Sutton Place South New York 2013

The scene at Barneys New York.

Photo By Lexie Moreland

Roy Lichtenstein had made his feelings on home goods known: “I don’t care what a cup of coffee looks like,” the artist once said, “I only care about how it’s drawn.”

Though not one for finer dishware, Barneys New York’s new home collection inspired by the artist’s work may have turned him around. On Thursday, partygoers descended upon the store’s Chelsea Passage for cocktails to celebrate the collaboration, clinking their Lichtenstein-printed cups amid the graphic goodies. Twenty-five percent of all sales of these wares will benefit the Art Production Fund.

“We’ve never done a full collection before and never worked with an estate, so we were incredibly careful and selective with the products,” said Casey Fremont, director of the nonprofit, her hands tucked into her Lisa Perry dress — a sleeveless sheath printed with a Lichtenstein graphic. “Isn’t it perfect? It’s very Mod. I’m super into it.”

Afterward, a winnowed-down group — Natalie Joos, Narciso Rodriguez, Cynthia Rowley and Derek Lam among them — headed to an intimate supper at Lisa Perry’s east side penthouse, where she and husband Richard Perry, Barneys chairman and majority owner, keep much of their impressive Pop art collection.

“This is —” one guest said, trailing off as they stepped off the elevator into the penthouse’s foyer. “Wow.”

Guests drifted through the rooms, giving themselves self-guided tours of the collection: the Jim Dines, the Warhols and, of course, the Lichtensteins. Joos documented a more contemporary piece: the boulder-size Jeff Koons emerald green diamond sculpture sitting on the terrace. “I need something for scale,” Joos said looking around frantically before settling on a champagne flute. She climbed on the elevated display platform to place it next to the sculpture.

“Wait, is this OK?” she asked, turning to Richard.

“Sure,” he shrugged.