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Reed Krakoff: One Chair

The designer's installation of chairs will be on display at Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn’s gallery, Salon 94, until March 2.

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When Reed Krakoff started his namesake label two years ago, he and his wife, Delphine, designed a felt-covered chair for the first store, which opened on Madison Avenue in New York in September 2010.

That modernist chair, which has an industrial, Bauhaus feel, triggered a design idea in Krakoff — an installation of chairs, which is now called “Reed Krakoff: One Chair” and will be on display at Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn’s gallery, Salon 94, from today to March 2.

The gray felt chair, he explained, “Became this touchstone for the brand in the way it was geometric and strict but upholstered in something organic and sensual. It was those contradictions and the opposing ideas of working together that became a good way of explaining what the brand is: architecture, sensuality and somewhat disparate ideas coming together.”

Krakoff re-created the chair 99 times with the same shape and measurements but in different color combinations, from red and yellow to black. The gray from the original version is present in each iteration of the chair.

Going through the process of designing chairs, Krakoff realized many similarities to putting together a ready-to-wear lineup.

“It was the same exact process I go through designing my collection,” he noted. “It was like putting together a runway collection.”

Each chair is unique, numbered and signed by Krakoff, and will be for sale at Salon 94. Krakoff and Greenberg Rohatyn will celebrate the opening Saturday at the gallery. Asked for his personal favorite of the chairs, Krakoff didn’t have to hesitate. “I still think it’s that first one,” he said, “because it was the jumping-off point.”

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