WWD.com/eye/fashion/we-said-it-3356740
fashion
fashion

We Said It

You may be surprised to see what phrases in the common lexicon originated in the pages of WWD.

fashion/news
Elizabeth Taylor in HotPants 1971

Elizabeth Taylor in HotPants, 1971.

Photo By Popperfoto/Getty Images

Appeared In
Special Issue
WWD 100 issue 11/01/2010

SA: Seventh Avenue

 

They Are Wearing: Copyrighted in 1924 and still very much in use.

 

Fashion Flash: Copyrighted in the Fifties.

 

The Locomotives: The movers and shakers.

 

RBs: Rich Bitches, coined in 1982.

 

Social Cyclones: Eighties terms for Gayfryd Steinberg and that ilk.

 

The Beautiful People: You know who you are.


Chic Savages: Well-dressed, well-mannered warriors whose smiles never fade.

 

The Empty Pit: The gossipy, underworld of the chic.

 

HotPants: Barely there shorts, coined in 1970. (Sears Roebuck & Co. and Montgomery Ward quickly jumped on the trend.) When lengths inched down, WWD promptly called them WarmPants.

 

Midi: The longer lengths originally inspired by Dr. Zhivago and seen in Paris in 1966. They would start to appear in ready-to-wear collections over the next few seasons.

 

Longuette: The longer skirts of the Seventies.


Jackie O: The former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.


Daddy O:
Her second husband.


Her Ultimate Elegance:
Gloria Guinness


The Tiny Terror:
Truman Capote


Mr. Fashion Right: Bill Blass


The Frog Pond: La Grenouille


L’Institut de l’Ennui: All those boring people.


Mr. Clean: Calvin Klein


Numero Uno:
Giorgio Armani


The Chic:
Valentino


Kaiser Karl: Karl Lagerfeld


The Lunch Bunch: Affluent socialites.


Nouvelle Society: Eighties social climbers.


Fashion Nuns: Those who favor a monastery-type look from Yohji Yamamoto.


Sportive: Casual looks out of Paris in the Sixties.


Le Smoking: Smoking jackets à la Yves Saint Laurent.


Tough Chic: Hard-edged fashion.


Geek Chic: IT-friendly attire.


The Nursery of Fashion: What is Paris, France?


Walker: A self-possessed man-about-town escorting well-heeled women on the party circuit. It was said to be first used about Jerry Zipkin, who became a confidant to some of society’s best-known and most affluent women. Zipkin was also called the Social Moth, or SM, because of the indefatigable manner with which he carried out his mission.


Wobbly WASPs: Blueblood society types, titans, celebrities.

 

The Ubiquitor: A seasonal sobriquet awarded to the celeb or socialite who attends all things all the time.

 

Killer Bs: When the A-list gets too pricy, it’s time to summon these eager Bs to fill out any old front row.


The Delebrity: Celebrities who want to be designers and vice versa.