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Clarins Treatment Line Tailored for Skin Type, Climate

Groupe Clarins' newest line of moisturizers, HydraQuench Multi-Climate, is meant to suit any face anywhere on earth.

By
with contributions from Jennifer Weil
HydraQuench items from Clarins

HydraQuench items from Clarins.

Photo By WWD Staff

PARIS — Groupe Clarins' newest line of moisturizers, HydraQuench Multi-Climate, is meant to suit any face anywhere on earth.

That's because the five creams and lotions in the collection, due out worldwide in January, are blended to allow people to chose formulations adapted to their type of skin or local climate, according to company executives.

"[The line] takes into account skin type — normal, combination, dry and very dry — and surrounding climate — hot, cold and temperate," explained Stella Wong, marketing director of Clarins France.

"It's like the clothes you wear according to the climate you are in," added Brigitte Decaux, Clarins' international marketing manager.

HydraQuench is Clarins' key treatment launch for 2008, according to the company. While its executives declined to reveal revenue targets, industry sources estimate HydraQuench will generate first-year retail sales of $60 million.

With moisturizing as its key claim, HydraQuench has a broad target base, company executives said.

"Everyone needs hydration," said Wong, adding the line complements other Clarins face care products, which target specific concerns, such as wrinkles.

For HydraQuench's formulas, Clarins sourced ingredients it claims are rarely used in cosmetics, including katafray bark, said to boost skin's moisturizing mechanisms by increasing the production of fillagrin, a protein. In Madagascar, where it is sourced under Clarins' fair trade program, katafray is used as an anti-inflammatory and a face mask.

Clarins also developed a complex from wheat containing two forms of hyaluronic acid, which forms a film on skin to lock moisture in, according to the company. Sorbier tree extract is said to regulate the size of blood capillaries, which are particularly sensitive to climate change. Clarins' E3P complex is included to protect skin from electromagnetic waves and pollution, according to company executives.

While the formulas for the five moisturizers are largely the same, each was adapted for a skin type and most to a particular environment. The HydraQuench Cooling Cream-Gel Normal to Combination Skin or Hot Climates, for example, is meant for the exact demographic its name suggests. That is thanks to a pomegranate extract included to help skin combat heat by tightening dilated pores, Clarins said. Meanwhile, for colder climes, HydraQuench Rich Cream Very Dry Skin or Cold Climates contains an extract of Arctic cloudberry, a fruit found in Finland, which Clarins said acts as a sort of antifreeze for skin due to its nourishing essential fatty acids.
The line also contains a product deemed as emergency repair for dehydrated skin in any climate. HydraQuench Intensive Serum Bi-Phase Dehydrated Skin contains oil from the Inca peanut to rebuild skin's barrier against moisture loss plus an extract of alfalfa grass, deemed to boost collagen production, according to the company.

HydraQuench products come in a range of textures, including creams, cream-gels and lotions.

Product prices range from 49.50 euros, or $71.20 at average exchange, for a 50-ml. jar of HydraQuench Rich Cream for Normal to Dry Skin to 57 euros, or $82, for a 30-ml. bottle of HydraQuench Intensive Serum Bi-Phase Dehydrated Skin.

Single- and double-page advertising, showing a model relaxing in water and the HydraQuench products, will break in February magazines.

Also in the realm of products for more on-the-go use is Clarins' Body Shaping Supplement, due out Jan. 1 in the U.S. and February elsewhere. It contains the same ingredients as the company's best-selling Clarins Body Lift Minceur slimming product, but has been reformulated so it may be added easily and effectively to any of the firm's other products — from creams to lotions to gels, according to company executives. While they would not talk numbers, industry sources estimate the product will ring up $10 million at wholesale in its first year worldwide. Each pair of 25-ml. Body Shaping Supplement bottles will sell for $75.

In retail news, Clarins opened its first European freestanding store — a retail environment including treatment rooms — in Paris, called Boutique Clarins. The 1,500-square-foot space opened in October. Industry sources estimate it generates $44,000 a month.