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Architecture Influential In Brow Expert's Work

From art and architecture to eyebrows? It's not the most common of career switches by any stretch of the imagination, but it works for Anastasia Soare.

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Anastasia Soare

Anastasia Soare

Photo By WWD Staff

From art and architecture to eyebrows? It's not the most common of career switches by any stretch of the imagination, but it works for Anastasia Soare.

"Studying technical design and art gave me the ability to see things in 3-D," said the Los Angeles-based brow expert. "Back then, we didn't have computers — we figured things with pencils. Once I became an aesthetician, I took that knowledge and studied the bone structure of every ethnic group. It has helped me to find the perfect shape for anyone's bone structure."

Born and raised in Romania, Soare earned a degree from the Romania College of Architecture. But after taking time off to be with her husband and newborn daughter, she found it challenging to find work in that field. Switching gears, she enrolled in cosmetology school, earning an aesthetician's license — which fueled her passion for brows and products.

"Keep in mind that this was Romania in the Communist era," said Soare. "We would go to the pharmacy and buy ingredients so we could mix up products for our aesthetics clients. To do that well, I studied a little cosmetic chemistry, and that was the genesis of my first brow products."

In 1989, Soare and her family emigrated to the U.S., where she began working as an aesthetician at a small salon on Melrose in L.A. "I didn't speak the language and I didn't know how to drive on the freeways," Soare said with a laugh. "I drove everywhere with a Thomas Brothers [the pre-GPS bible of Southern Californians] map on my lap!"

In 1992, Soare struck out on her own, first renting a small space at the Juan Juan Beauty Center in Beverly Hills and in 1997 signing a lease for her own space on Bedford Drive in Beverly Hills. "There were not salon boutiques at that time, to speak of," said Soare, whose salon has just celebrated its 10th anniversary. "So after two years, we had to have our own product line, at least for makeup — none of the big prestige companies wanted to sell to small boutiques at that time. And there were no brow products commercially available."
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